Join us as we wrap up our last day of our festival today!
And celebrate 10 years tonight after our last film with our wrap up party at Margarita’s! 11 Brown St, Portland!

1/2 Day Saturday [afternoon 1-5:00pm or evening 6:30-10:30p]:
General Admission: $8
Seniors, children, non-USM students with ID: $5
USM Students: FREE with USM ID
Reception 5-6:30p at the 7th Floor Glickman Library Ticket holders for either 1/2 day gain access to the reception.

Full Day Saturday [1-10:30p]:
General Admission: $14
Seniors, children, non-USM students with ID: $10
USM Students: FREE with USM ID
Reception 5-6:30p at the 7th Floor Glickman Library

SATURDAY:
Afternoon Session [1-5:00p]:

Luther Bonney Auditorium

1:00 pm – Introductions
1:15 pm – Animation
Chasing Cotton Clouds, UK, 2011, 24 min., BSL/English subtitles. Director: Sam Dore. A young boy creates a fantasy world to help cope with the alienation he feels at home and at school.

1:45 pm – Science Fiction
Exit the Sun, US, 2011, 11.14 min, ASL/English subtitles. Directors: Bradley Gantt and Chase Burton. Two unlikely character cross paths in a place neither here nor there.
The End, UK, 2011, 24 min, BSL/English subtitles. Director: Ted Evans. Starting in the 1980s, The End follows four Deaf Children over 60 years.  After the introduction of a treatment aimed at eradicating deafness, the very survival of Deaf language and culture is at stake.

2:25 pm – About the Holocaust/Nazism
Five Needles, UK, 2011, 16 min., BSL/English subtitles. Director: Julian Peedle-Calloo. Five Needles follows the lives of four Deaf Jewish women as they strive to find security and peace within the routine and confines of a Nazi sewing factory.
Deaf Austrians and National Socialism: The Clubs, Austria, 2009, 20 min, Austrian Sign Language/English subtitles. Directors: Verena Krausneker and Katharina Schalber.  In 1938 Austria turned National Socialist, putting its small Deaf community under great pressure.  Anyone who was suspected of “hereditary Deafness” was forcefully sterilized, and Deaf Jews were persecuted and murdered. This documentary shows how well-organized structure of Deaf clubs was changed by the National Socialist regime within a few months.

3:00 pm – A Documentary about surviving Breast Cancer
Signing On, a film about a group of Minnesota Deaf women who find their way in the hearing- dominated world of the American healthcare system…a world where being understood is a matter of life and death. Signing On is a story about ANITA BUEL, a 24-year survivor and founder of the Pink Deafies, the only breast cancer support group for Deaf women in the country. Within two weeks of her six-minutes of fame in an interview on a local TV station, she became an instant sensation and magnet for Deaf women from 22 states who were desperate for information about breast cancer. The story follows Anita for three years with unexpected turns in her own health and the health of her daughters who are forced to face the consequences of discovering they are BRCA1 positive—a genetic form of breast cancer.

4:30 pm – Guest Speakers: Anita & Tim Buel

5:00pm – 6:30pm – Reception at the Glickman Library, 7th Floor, 314 Forest Avenue, Portland. Open to all film festival attendees.

6:30 pm – British Dramatic Comedy
Admit None
, UK, 2011, 13 min, in BSL and English subtitles. Producer: Maverick Litchfield Kelly. Follows two Deaf colleagues as a trip to the cinema results in a surreal hunt for the subtitles missing from the film they have paid to watch.
50/50, UK, 28 min., in BSL and English subtitles. Director: David Ellington. A light comedy, which tells the story of Jez (Hearing) and Andy (Deaf).  Broke and living in a van, Jez dreams up the perfect get-rich scam, but is it a scam too far for Andy?
Otherside, UK, 2011, 18 min., in BSL and English subtitles. Director: Nick Sturley. Otherside is a supernatural comedy set in an insurance office.  Calin awakes to find that all is not well in the workplace.  Who are those two people that are hanging around and just why is everybody ignoring him?

7:30 pm – Transgendered
Austin Unbound:  From the age of three, Austin knew that his female anatomy did not fit him. In middle school, he changed his name and began to dress as a boy. His family thought it was a phase, but he persisted. Now he will get surgery so he can breathe freely and finally, swim in public.
8:15 pm – Guest Speaker: Eliza Greenwood, the director, and Austin, the subject of the film, will be with us via Skype after the film.

9:00 pm – Artistic Pursuits II
Deaf Jam is the story of deaf teen Aneta Brodski’s bold journey into the spoken word slam scene. In a wondrous twist, Aneta, an Israeli immigrant living in the Queens section of New York City, eventually meets Tahani, a hearing Palestinian slam poet. The two women embark on a collaboration/performance duet. Poetry, friendship and respect transcend politics as the two young women create a new form of slam poetry that speaks to both the hearing and the Deaf. Deaf Jam had it’s U.S. broadcast premiere on the Emmy® Award-winning PBS series Independent Lens in November, 2011.

White Space, US, 2011, 9 min., ASL/English subtitles. Director: Maya Washington. A Deaf man, in spite of his reservations, enters an Urban Poetry Open Mic and performs his poem “White Space” – on his terms.

10:15 pm – Between Two Worlds
My Song – A young deaf girl learns sign language to try and find herself, but instead becomes caught between the deaf and hearing worlds. My Song is the debut drama from C&B Films, a new production company headed by director William Mager and scriptwriter Charlie Swinbourne, aiming to tell stories that express deaf culture in an original, compelling way.

Words, US, 2011, 15 min, ASL and English subtitles. Director: Anup Bhandari. Words is a story about Juliet (Miriam Liora Ganz) and Owen (Russell Harvard), a deaf man, who meet at the iconic Bethesda Fountain in the snow covered Central Park.  Their conversation begins awkwardly but over the next few days, she comes up with interesting ways to communicate with him.  The friendship slowly appears to blossom into romance but the difference between silence and words may be more than it seems.

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